Missing Mum or Dad? Parents of Australian citizens or permanent residents can get longer visitor visas to Australia

Life is hard when you live in one country and your parents live far away. Waiting for a Parent visa can seem like forever and you worry about Mum or Dad (or both of them) being on their own as they’re getting older, as well as feeling lonely for their company and wishing they could spend time with their grandchildren in Australia. Maybe it’s time for a visit. Parents wanting to visit their Australian citizen or permanent resident children and/or grand-children may be able to access longer term visitor visas with multiple entry facilities to allow them to visit Australia for up to 12 months at a time. This applies for parents of adult Australian citizens and permanent residents. It does not apply for parents of minor children who are Australian citizens or permanent residents. Such parents should make different arrangements. The Department of Immigration and Border Protection states availability as follows:

Maximum validity periods of up to:

  • five years for parents outside Australia and in the Parent visa queue
  • three years for parents outside Australia who have:
         o had a previous Australian visa and complied with the conditions; and
         o have not applied for a Parent visa; or
         o have applied for a Parent visa but are not yet in the Parent visa queue
  • 18 months for parents who have:
         o not previously traveled to Australia; and
         o have not applied for a Parent visa; or
         o have applied for a Parent visa but are not yet in the Parent visa queue.

Please note that longer validity visas:

  • will not be considered for people requesting stays of less than 12 months
  • are not available to people who apply in Australia
  • will be subject to condition 8503, which means that you cannot apply for a new visa while you are in Australia. This condition may be waived in exceptional circumstances.

In addition to meeting all other Visitor visa requirements, you will need to:

  • Indicate clearly on your application form that you wish to apply for a longer validity visa (with 12 month stay).
  • Undergo a medical examination – More information on this requirement is available. 
  • Maintain health insurance while in Australia – More information on this requirement is available.
  • Ensure that you do not stay in Australia for more than 12 months in any 18 month period. Like all visitors, parents granted Visitor visas are expected to maintain extended periods of absence between visits to Australia. Your visa will be subject to condition 8558, which states that you must not stay in Australia for more than 12 months in any 18 month period. If you do not comply with this condition, your visa may be liable for cancellation.

Like any visitor visa application, it is very important when applying, to show that the applicants have strong reasons to return to their home country at the end of the visitor visa. This may include showing property and financial resources in the home country, showing employment or study there (if the parents are not yet retired) and showing other family members who live there. Evidence should be provided at the time of application. Seek professional assistance if you are unsure of how to prepare the application.

Michele Clayton

Migration Agents Registration Number 0957773

Legal Practitioner NSW 55486

2 thoughts on “Missing Mum or Dad? Parents of Australian citizens or permanent residents can get longer visitor visas to Australia

  1. My mum has visa subclass 600 with condition 8558. Is there any chance we can waive this condition (8558) as my wife need bed rest for atleast 6 months due to pregnancy complications. We got letter from doctor.

    1. Hello Bikash, there is no waiver option available for condition 8558. However, if your Mum’s visa is also affected by condition 8503 (no further stay), it may be possible to have that condition waived and for your Mum to apply for a new visitor visa in Australia and to request a visa for a long enough period to care for your wife during her convalescence. The success of this approach would probably depend on your capacity to show that there is no one else available to care for your wife (and your existing children if you have any)during that period. Michele Clayton MARN 0957773 Legal Practitioner NSW 55486

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